20521. Environmental Economics in Tourist Areas . Group 34

Subject

Name20521 - Environmental Economics in Tourist Areas
Group Grup 34 ( Campus Digital )
Academic Year 2018-19
Credits6 credits
Period 2nd semester
Language English
Titulació
  • Double Degree in Business Administration and Tourism - Fourth year
  • Degree in Geography - Third year
  • Degree in Tourism - Third year
  • Double Degree in Economics and Tourism (2015) - Fourth year

Lecturers

LecturerOffice hours for students
Start timeEnd timeDay of the weekStart dateEnd dateLocation/Building
Catalina Maria Torres Figuerola
cati.torrescati.torres@uib.esuib.es
(Head of group)
12:00h13:00h Monday 10/09/201828/06/2019 DB-254/Jovellanos (cita prèvia per e-mail)

Context

The course attempts to provide the students with knowledge which on the basis of what they have learnt in past courses especially in those related to tourism-generated impacts, allows them to manage the tourism destination according to sustainability principles. On the one hand, the course pursues to make students familiar with the concepts, principles, theories and methodologies of neoclassical environmental economics, a discipline which from a chrematistic perspective is one of the most widely, used economic approaches to environmental conflict analysis and management. It is then a discipline providing information about one of the tourism economic dimensions. In this sense, and after completing the course, students are expected to acquire knowledge about how neoclassical economics explains environmental degradation and the economic value of ecosystem services; Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA) and the implications for CBA-based decision-making of considering risk and uncertainty; the functioning of market-based environmental policy tools; the different interpretations of the concept of sustainability and the existing conflict between pursuit of environmental goals and pursuit of economic growth; and some relevant issues involving the relationship between firms and the environment.

For a better understanding of the implications of adopting a neoclassical economics perspective for the analysis of the human-induced impacts on the biosphere as well as for the management of human activities on the basis of sustainability issues, the course will also provide some insights into what environment means, how it has been perceived and dealt with in economic thought, and the principles underlying alternative economic approaches.

This way the course wants to make the students capable to analyse critically the information and knowledge acquired over the Tourism Degree and apply them to specific situations of the tourism context. No doubt, this course will be useful not only for the future professional career of the students but especially for them to become critical, participatory, active, responsible and committed citizens.

The language of instruction for this course will be English. Students taking this course will learn specific economic/tourism-related vocabulary and develop both their productive and receptive skills in English, and therefore acquire further knowledge of the English language.

Requirements

Recommended

It is recommended students are familiar with neoclassical economics analysis. It is also recommended they have knowledge of the English language.

Skills

Specific

  • CE-3. Recognizing the ways in which societies? social and spatial systems of organization influence types of tourism, the development of tourist seasons, and tourism impacts on the natural and human environments where tourism occurs.
  • CE-9. Applying key technologies used to study reciprocal links between the physical and human environment in different tourism frameworks, particularly those used to assess the environmental impacts of such activities, their consequences on the landscape and the transmission of scientific information so as to facilitate their application in academic and professional circles.
  • CE-10. Applying concepts, techniques and an understanding of different scientific fields to the resolution of problems (with adequate legislative knowledge), promotion of development, creation of wealth, and improved quality of life (for tourists and residents alike) through public and private sectoral planning, spatial planning, risk prevention, conservation, and policies in the fields of sustainability and equality, with quality of life and tourism experiences as key factors at all times.
  • CE-11. Knowing and applying concepts, methodologies and tools allowing the responsible management of natural resources, environmental protection and sustainable use of the territory in such a way this is compatible with the responsible satisfaction of growing needs for resources of locals and tourists.
  • CE-13. Demonstrating a command of a wide range of analytical and observational strategies, developed through habitual research methods used in different scientific fields during his/her academic training and consolidated in the workplace.
  • CE-14. Applying knowledge, methods and techniques in the workplace that have been acquired during his/her undergraduate training and developing them with a high degree of responsibility, ethical commitment and capacity for integration in multidisciplinary teams.

General

  • CG-1. Demonstrating and possessing a basic knowledge and basic understanding of tourism-related subjects through different scientific disciplines, together with their epistemological evolution and the links between each scientific discipline and all the other tourism-related ones, based on knowledge acquired at secondary school and onward up to a level that guarantees an awareness of spearhead studies in this field.
  • CG-2. Knowing how to apply technical and methodological knowledge to his/her work and doing so in a professional manner, integrating the different tourism-related subject areas that he/she has studied. Possessing the necessary skills and demonstrating them by putting forward and defending arguments and solving problems in relevant subject areas.
  • CG-3. Having the capacity to gather and interpret relevant quantitative, qualitative and spatial data, so as to make judgements that entail critical reflection on relevant tourism-related subjects of a spatial, social, economic, legal, scientific and ethical nature.
  • CG-4: Being able to get across information, ideas, problems and solutions in any of the tourism-related subject areas to both a specialist and non-specialist public.
  • CG-5: Having developed the necessary learning skills to undertake professional tasks and postgraduate tourism studies with a high degree of independence.

Basic

You may consult the basic competencies students will have to achieve by the end of the degree at the following address: http://www.uib.eu/study/grau/Basic-Competences-In-Bachelors-Degree-Studies/

Content

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Thematic content

MODULE I INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS IN TOURIST AREAS
Unit 1 The environment and the economy

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Unit 2 Neoclassical economics as a foundation for environmental economics

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Unit 3 The environmental degradation of tourism destinations as a market failure

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MODULE II THE ECONOMIC VALUATION IN TOURIST AREAS
Unit 4 The economic value of natural tourist attractions

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Unit 5 Efficiency, equity and ethics in the management of natural tourist attractions

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Unit 6 The economic valuation methods

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MODULE III THE ROLE OF CBA IN THE MANAGEMENT OF TOURIST AREAS
Unit 7 What?s Cost-Benefit analysis'

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Unit 8 Risk and uncertainty in Cost-Benefit Analysis

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MODULE IV ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY IN TOURISM DESTINATIONS
Unit 9 Environmental policy tools

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MODULE V SUSTAINABILITY AND GROWTH IN TOURISM DESTINATIONS
Unit 10 Sustainability in tourism destinations

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Unit 11 Growth and conservation in tourism destinations

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MODULE VI FIRMS AND THE ENVIRONMENT IN TOURIST AREAS
Unit 12 The firm in the face of environmental problems

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Teaching methodology

This is an in-person course for the groups in English in the morning. For the groups in Catalan and in English in the afternoon, it is an in-person course in Palma and a videoconference course in Menorca. The lectures, the material and the exams for the English groups will be in English.

Attended activities (1,8 credits, 45 hours)

TypeNameG. typeDescriptionHours
Theory classes Master classes Large group (G)

The master classes will serve to explain the theoretical issues corresponding to each of the units of the course?s contents.

22.5
Practical classes Text analysis, discussions and conferences Large group (G)

To facilitate the understanding of the theoretical concepts and their application to real situations of the Balearic tourist context, the master classes will be complemented with practical classes oriented to, on the one hand, the analysis of texts, laws, news and academic articles and, on the other one, promotion of discussion and debate for instance through guided discussions. Some conferences given by experts and/or practitioners who work on fields being object of study during the course and who will be asked to explain their view about some topical issues will also be part of the practical classes. There is also the possibility of organizing some visit to a mature tourist area.

15
Assessment Mid-term test 1 Large group (G)

Mid-term multiple-choice test about the theoretical issues explained in class during the first weeks of the course. There is the possibility this test includes some short-answer questions. All the questions will make reference to a text.

1.5
Assessment Mid-term test 2 Large group (G)

Mid-term multiple-choice test about the theoretical issues explained until the day of the test. There is the possibility this test includes some short-answer questions. All the questions will make reference to a text.

1.5
Assessment Text 1 assessment Large group (G)

Oral assessment of a first academic article, news or environmental regulation at the regional, state or European level related to the units explained in class. For the students to be able to prepare this assessment, they will know in advance which the text being object of assessment will be and they will also be given a list of questions about the text they will be able to work on at home.

1.5
Assessment Text 2 assessment Large group (G)

Oral assessment of a second academic article, news or environmental regulation at the regional, state or European level related to the units explained in class. For the students to be able to prepare this assessment, they will know in advance which the text being object of assessment will be and they will also be given a list of questions about the text they will be able to work on at home.

1.5
Assessment Final test Large group (G)

Multiple-choice test about all the theoretical issues explained during the course where all the questions will make reference to a text. This test will also include some optional questions related to the conferences held during the course.

1.5

At the beginning of the semester the subject schedule will be available to students through the UIBdigital platform. This schedule will at least include the dates for the continuous assessment exams and assignment deadlines. Furthermore, the lecturer will inform students as to whether the subject syllabus will be carried out according to the schedule or otherwise, including Campus Extens.

Non-attended activities (4,2 credits, 105 hours)

TypeNameDescriptionHours
Individual self-study Study

Study of the theoretical issues explained during the course.

65
Group or individual self-study Readings and text analysis

Reading and analysis of the texts, laws, news and academic articles which will be discussed in class and will also be object of oral assessments.

40

Specific risks and protective measures

The learning activities of this course do not entail specific health or safety risks for the students and therefore no special protective measures are needed.

Student learning assessment

To pass the course, students need to get both at least 3,5 marks over 10 in the final test AND a global, weighted grade of at least 5 marks over 10. However, there will be some optional questions in the final test which will give the chance to pass the course to the students who have got a global, weighted grade between 4.45 and 4.9 over 10 provided they have got at least 3.5 marks over 10 in the final test and they have attended ALL the conferences and participated in ALL the activities held during the course. In particular, if the students meeting the above-mentioned requirements decide to respond the optional questions and reason them out properly showing they have gained understanding of the concepts learnt during the course, they will be able to get up to 0.5 additional marks over the global, weighted grade of the course (thus getting 5 marks over 10).

If the students do not pass the course, they will have the possibility of doing a test in July which will account for 80% of the global grade.

On the other side, students should note that, according to UIB academic regulations, they will have the right to do a test on a different day or at a diffrent time from the official ones ONLY in some specific cases. It is highly recommended students read carefully the academic rules before asking for a change of a test date/time.

In accordance with article 33 of the Academic Regulations, "regardless of the disciplinary procedure that may be followed against the offending student , the demonstrably fraudulent performance of any of the evaluation elements included in the teaching guides of the subjects will lead, at the discretion of the teacher, to an undervaluation in the qualification that may suppose the qualification of "suspense 0" in the annual evaluation of the subject".

Mid-term test 1
Type Assessment
Technique Objective tests ( retrievable )
Description

Mid-term multiple-choice test about the theoretical issues explained in class during the first weeks of the course. There is the possibility this test includes some short-answer questions. All the questions will make reference to a text.

Assessment criteria

It will be assessed the ability of students to understand the theoretical issues discussed in class as well as their capacity to interrelate them and analyze them. In case some short-answer questions are included, the students? written expression skills will also be object of assessment.

Final grade percentage: 15%

Mid-term test 2
Type Assessment
Technique Objective tests ( retrievable )
Description

Mid-term multiple-choice test about the theoretical issues explained until the day of the test. There is the possibility this test includes some short-answer questions. All the questions will make reference to a text.

Assessment criteria

It will be assessed the ability of students to understand the theoretical issues discussed in class as well as their capacity to interrelate them and analyze them. In case some short-answer questions are included, the students? written expression skills will also be object of assessment.

Final grade percentage: 25%

Text 1 assessment
Type Assessment
Technique Oral tests ( non-retrievable )
Description

Oral assessment of a first academic article, news or environmental regulation at the regional, state or European level related to the units explained in class. For the students to be able to prepare this assessment, they will know in advance which the text being object of assessment will be and they will also be given a list of questions about the text they will be able to work on at home.

Assessment criteria

It will be assessed whether the students have read the text and undertood the concepts discussed in class. Their ability to summarize and transfer knowledge and to express ideas and arguments clearly, rigorously and convincingly will also be object of assessment.

Final grade percentage: 10%

Text 2 assessment
Type Assessment
Technique Oral tests ( non-retrievable )
Description

Oral assessment of a second academic article, news or environmental regulation at the regional, state or European level related to the units explained in class. For the students to be able to prepare this assessment, they will know in advance which the text being object of assessment will be and they will also be given a list of questions about the text they will be able to work on at home.

Assessment criteria

It will be assessed whether the students have read the text and undertood the concepts discussed in class. Their ability to summarize and transfer knowledge and to express ideas and arguments clearly, rigorously and convincingly will also be object of assessment.

Final grade percentage: 10%

Final test
Type Assessment
Technique Objective tests ( retrievable )
Description

Multiple-choice test about all the theoretical issues explained during the course where all the questions will make reference to a text. This test will also include some optional questions related to the conferences held during the course.

Assessment criteria

It will be assessed the ability of students to understand the theoretical issues discussed in class as well as their capacity to interrelate them and analyze them. Regarding the optional questions referring to the conferences held during the course, the students? capacity to relate the topics dealt with in the conferences with the issues explained in class will also be object of assessment.

Final grade percentage: 40%

Resources, bibliography and additional documentation

Basic bibliography

Azqueta, D. (1994). Valoración económica de la calidad ambiental. Madrid: McGraw-Hill.
Azqueta, D. (2002). Introducción a la economía ambiental. Madrid: McGraw-Hill.
Boyle, K. J. (2003a). Contingent valuation in practice. En P. A. Champ, K. J. Boyle & T. C. Brown (Eds.), A primer of nonmarket valuation (pp. 111-170). The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
Boyle, K. J. (2003b). Introduction to revealed preference methods. En P. A. Champ, K. J. Boyle y T. C. Brown (Eds.), A primer of nonmarket valuation (pp. 259-267). The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
Brown, T. C. (2003). Introduction to stated preference methods. En P. A. Champ, K. J. Boyle y T. C. Hanley, N. y Barbier, E. B. (2009). Pricing nature. Cost-Benefit Analysis and Environmental Policy. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar.
Hanley, N., Shogren, J. F., y White, B. (2007). Environmental economics. In theory and practice. New York: Palgrave McMillan.
Labandeira, X., León, C. J., y Vázquez, M. X. (2007). Economía ambiental. Madrid: Pearson Educación, S.A.
Naredo, J. M. (1992). Fundamentos de la economía ecológica. En F. Aguilera y V. Alcántara (Eds.), De la economía ambiental a la economía ecológica (pp. 373-399). Barcelona: Icaria.
Pearce, D. W., Atkinson, G., y Mourato, S. (2006). Cost-benefit analysis and the environment. Paris: OCDE Publishing.
Perman, R., Ma, Y., McGilvray, J., y Common, M. (2003). Natural resource and environmental economics. Harlow, England: Pearson Education Limited.
Riera, P., García, D., Kriström, B., y Brännlund, R. (2005). Manual de economía ambiental y de los recursos naturales. Madrid: Thompson Editores.
Vatn, A. (2005). Institutions and the environment. Cheltenham: Edward Elgar Publishing, Inc.

Additional bibliography

Azqueta, D. (1994). La problemática de la gestión óptima de los recursos naturales: aspectos institucionales En D. Azqueta & A. Ferreiro (Eds.), Análisis económico y gestión de recursos naturales (pp. 51-72). Madrid: Alianza Editorial.
Baumol, W. J. y Oates, W. E. (1982). La teoría de la política económica del medio ambiente. Barcelona: Antoni Bosch.
Flores, N. E. (2003). Conceptual framework for nonmarket valuation. En P. A. Champ, K. J. Boyle y T. C. Brown (Eds.), A primer on nonmarket valuation (pp. 27-43). The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.
Franco, L. (1995). Política económica del medio ambiente. Barcelona: Cedecs Economía.
Jacobs, M. (1991). La economía verde. Barcelona: Icaria.
Margalef, R. (1992). Ecología. Barcelona: Editorial Planeta.
Martínez, J. y Schlüpmann, K. (1992). La ecología y la economía. Madrid: Textos de Economía, Fondo de Cultura Económica.
Naredo, J. M. (2015). La economía en evolución. Historia y perspectivas de las categorías básicas del pensamiento económico. Madrid: Siglo XXI de España Editores, S.A.
Parsons, G. R. (2003). The travel cost model. En P. A. Champ, K. J. Boyle y T. C. Brown (Eds.), A primer of nonmarket valuation (pp. 269-296). The Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Other resources

Torres, C. y Hanley, N. (2016). Economic valuation of coastal and marine ecosystem services in the 21st century. An overview from a management perspective
(disponible en http://dea.uib.es/digitalAssets/366/366392_w75.pdf).